What’s Your Superpower?

"Barry's real superpower isn't speed, it's hope. The kid's got an endless reservoir. Thinks it's all gonna work out!" ~ HR

I have a confession, I am a superhero junkie. I love watching superhero tv shows, movies, and even the cartoons with my kids. I love the idea of good vs. evil. I love the idea of a hero.

With all this in mind, this quote totally grabbed my attention the other night as we were watching The Flash on Netflix. HR, one of the characters, said that the Flash's superpower wasn't speed, but rather was hope. He said that Flash always thinks that things are going to work out. It struck me because his "superpower" wasn't something make believe. It was something we all can have.

This got me thinking about teachers. We all have this enormous amount of hope. We hope for our schools. We hope for our communities. We hope for our students and their families. (and some of us hope for tenure, let's be real!)

The idea of hope has weighed heavy on me these past couple of years. There are so many things I've hoped and wished for that haven't happened and there are some things that did. I wont pretend like the things that didn't weren't disappointing, they were. BUT, I try to maintain a hope that things will work out, that there is a bigger and better plan for me.

This year, as its start gets closer and closer, I want to remind us all to maintain our hope. Dream and hope for bigger and better things for yourselves, your families, your students, your school and your community. Instead of saying that being a teacher is your superpower, let's make it hope. I honestly think that this superpower is one we can pass on to those around us.

Flash image from http://media.comicbook.com/2016/07/the-flash-192898.jpg

You Are Enough, Eat The Waffle Fries

“You are enough, Eat The Waffle Fries”

I’m coining this quote as my own, but the inspiration came from somewhere else. I’ve been thinking a lot lately about podcasting and possibly starting my own podcast. My brother and his wife told me about The Popcast With Knox and Jamie, https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-popcast-with-knox-and-jamie/id712316884?mt=2 because they had met Jamie over the summer. (and they had lots of nice things to say about her!)

After their endorsement, I immediately subscribed to their podcast and downloaded one of their first podcasts from 2013. They talked pop culture, actors and actresses, movies, and tv, but what inspired me was their conversation about social media. They referenced an article that talked about how depressing these sites and apps can be. Somehow during that conversation, Jamie referenced both waffle fries and the phrase “You are worthy.”

This got me thinking about a conversation I’ve seen multiple times. Teachers, and non-teachers, stop comparing yourself to others in negative ways. Notice I said “in negative ways.” This was on purpose because I don’t think comparison is always bad. For example, you make brownies from scratch, twice, and you notice that your second batch is better. Comparison as a form of reflection isn’t always bad. We can use it to set goals for ourselves and our students. 

Comparison in negative ways is never good. You see a picture on Pinterest, Facebook, Instagram, wherever and you think you’ll never measure up or that you’ll never be that pretty/strong/organized/together. This thought process is never ok. 

So, with all this in mind. Aim high. Try to be better. Reflect and move forward. Aim even higher. Do your best and then do better. You are good enough. You are accepted. You are loved. You are great today and you will be even greater tomorrow. It doesn’t mean you won’t mess up. Don’t let you mess-ups and mistakes define you. 

“You are enough, Eat The Waffle Fries”

Among the Rocks, They Still Can Bloom

Flowers fascinate me sometimes. Yes, they are beautiful to look at, but I’m actually talking about their resilience. 

One of my kids and I took a short hike the other day at Ruffner Mountain and we ran across this flower. What struck me wasn’t its color or beauty, but rather its location. In the picture you can see that it’s growing among a lot of rocks. 


We all know from our childhood Sunday School lesson that a seed doesn’t grow among the rocks, but this one did, and it wasn’t the only one. There were several that made its way out. 

All of this got me thinking about education. Our kids, we don’t always know what rocks may be holding them down. According to “data” some of them have quite a few rocks to work through. Here in Alabama a recent (public) conversation has begun regarding the discrepancy is test scores based on race and poverty. We also know, because we are teachers, that home life, hunger, depression, and language can also be rocks in the way. 

One of the things we get to do as teachers is help remove these rocks. This can be done in several ways. 
One, we can help empower and strengthen our students so that they can move them themselves. We can also try and move them for them. For a child that is hungry, some packs of crackers for the evening or weekend can be quite helpful. Another way is to move them with them. Together. We can form a TEAM. Together Everyone Achieves More, you’ve heard it before, and you know it’s true. We can form a team with our students, their families, the school, and/or the community. 

While I would advocate for all those things, we know that any of them are beneficial. We know the results of our students moving the rocks. They grow. They show their strength to the world as they don’t let “the rocks” stand in the way. They bloom. They face the world and show themselves to be a thing of beauty, and they all have that beauty inside of them. 

Thoughts on the Fourth of July 


The Fourth of July, Independence Day. We celebrate the founding of a country. Perhaps the best known quote from it is…

“We hold these truths to be self-evident: That all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” — Declaration of Independence

When I think of this statement, I think of the rich diversity of this country. People from all over the world come and join this country as citizens to start a new life here. It’s their “pursuit of happiness.” As they do this, they bring the richness of their culture, all the best of it, and combine it with the greatness here. I have to believe that this process is what makes us great today. We aren’t just one, we are many, all different, yet all together. This works best when we recognize that “all men are created equal.” 

“For the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.” — Declaration of Independence

I can’t help but think, today, of my family at home and my family at school. We are culturally different but we are together. They bring their best and their differences, and I hope we do the same and we all grow together. 

“We must be unanimous; there must be no pulling different ways; we must hang together.” — John Hancock

I think it’s important, as a teacher and parent, to recognize and celebrate our differences. I think it’s important to learn from each other. I think we are a better people, a better community, and a better country when we do this. We can also contribute and be part of a better world too.